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This 'Achieve Support' discussion paper details a concept for the implementation of a fully integrated impairment related assistance and support assessment and allocation system and process as described by Simon Stevens, an independent dysability consultant working in the adult social care and disability field.


The intention is that the proposed idea would replace much of the policies, systems and structures of adult social care and disability related welfare benefits within the UK. The concept can be seen as a combination of ideas and principles that has been brought together in a coordinated and coherent concept in how social care and impairment related support, designed for children, young people, working aged adults and older people, can be delivered effectively and efficiently in a manner that is truly personalised and able to meet future funding requirements.


The paper acknowledges that much of current social care policy regards adults, e.g. anyone over the aged of 18, as a single group. Since there is a greater number of older people, people over 65, than working aged adults, a generalisation of policy and practice assume that the needs of older people will naturally dominate the agenda, pushing working aged adults aside. The crux of the paper is a belief that the support needs of working aged adults should be seen differently to that of older adults in terms of its purpose and outcomes, but current policies often ignore these specific needs. This has implications in terms of assessment, eligibility, rights, responsibilities and other issues. It is important to clarifying what exactly support could look like to be more inclusive to everyone, and therefore the paper hopes to assist social care policy makers in meeting the needs of both working aged and older people.


This paper outlines 14 key foundation principals which make up the concept and the concept’s proposed working process for implementation. The paper also offers ways in which the concept can be implemented to replace adult social care departments and other organisations. The ultimate goal is for the concept to be widely known and then adopted as mainstream social policy which is then used to form new Government policy, regulations and laws.